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Interests, Lunatics, Whatever, Writing

Revising and George Bernard Shaw

Now I like plays, but the plays that I love the best are the ones that you can read.

These are plays that have directions noted in them. Sometimes they have introductions or post-scripts.

I like “Our Town” and some plays by Chekhov (although I read them in translation) but my favorite play to read is “Pygmalion” by George Bernard Shaw.

You can read it yourself on project Gutenberg here.

I like him, because he writes to be read. When the story is over, he has a complete explanation of what happens after the end that the audience never sees. Only the reader gets the benefit of his wisdom.

Now for my Lunatics project, we have been having people read my scripts, and one thing that I notice is that not everyone gets my humor. And even if they do, not everyone can deliver the lines correctly. So I’ve started to add direction to the scripts, and I’m making scripts that are more readable, and therefore a bit more fun.

This has been …is… a very cool experience.

Anyway, let me show you an example of a piece of my Emerson script before and after annotation. Tell me which you like better.

– Ros 8)

NO ANNOTATION

INTERVIEWER

Welcome Mr. Emerson. Thank you for joining us today.

EMERSON

Thank you, I’m glad to be here.

INTERVIEWER

Can you tell our audience a little about how your art speaks to the world.

EMERSON

It has always been my goal that my art should speak for itself.

INTERVIEWER

Yes, yes, I see.

Then can you tell us a little about your movement.

I mean what does it mean for you to be a conceptual artist?

EMERSON

I am not truly a conceptual artist.

I am a Meta-conceptual artist.

Where as a conceptual artist creates the idea that becomes a machine that makes the art.

I create the machine that makes the idea that becomes the machine that makes the art.

INTERVIEWER

So how does the “Meta-conceptual movement” fit into the art world of today.

EMERSON

My work, you understand, is on a much higher level than most of the art you see today.

The old art is still locked into a Cartesian representational frame. Despite the early conceptualist’s desire to divorce themselves from the mere craft of art they were still merely imitating reality, all-be-it, at a conceptual level.

I do not think that one should not make art that represents life.

One should make art that IS life.

INTERVIEWER

Wow. That’s amazing.

So, lets talk about your award-winning work

“When a tree falls in the forest”

Where did you get the idea for this work?

EMERSON

Well that’s a very interesting story. I was having a discussion with some of my friends over dim sum at LuLu Ma’s in Paris when the old saying came up ” When a tree falls in the forest and there is no one to hear it, does it make a sound.”

And I thought. “When a tree falls in the forest it means something to the tree.”

So I thought of making an artwork that can respond to art.

ANNOTATED

INTERVIEWER

Welcome Mr. Emerson. Thank you for joining us today.

EMERSON

Thank you, I’m glad to be here.

INTERVIEWER

Can you tell our audience a little about how your art speaks to the world.

EMERSON

(This is a double entendre because his art can talk so it literally ‘speaks for itself’ he knows he is being clever and the other guy doesn’t get it because he’s stupid)

It has always been my goal that my art should speak for itself.

INTERVIEWER

Yes, yes, I see.

(actually he doesn’t)

Then can you tell us a little about your movement.

I mean what does it mean for you to be a conceptual artist?

EMERSON

(He is pedantically correcting the interviewer for mis-saying the name of the movement.)

I am not truly a conceptual artist.

I am a Meta-conceptual artist.

(This sounds funniest if the cadence is the same for the first and second lines except the second line is longer. It is as if he is saying I am one step past those other guys.)

Where as a conceptual artist creates the idea that becomes a machine that makes the art.

I create the machine that makes the idea that becomes the machine that makes the art.
INTERVIEWER

(correcting himself)

So how does the “Meta-conceptual movement” fit into the art world of today?

EMERSON

(bragging. By ‘higher’ he means it is more abstract, but he comes off sounding like “I’m better than you.”)

My work, you understand, is on a much higher level than most of the art you see today.

(He is snowing the interviewer with technical jargon to sound smart.)

The old art is still locked into a Cartesian representational frame. Despite the early conceptualist’s desire to divorce themselves from the mere craft of art they were still merely imitating reality, all-be-it, at a conceptual level.

(A touch of the mad scientist here)

I do not think that one should make art that merely represents life.

One should make art that IS life.
INTERVIEWER

(completely impressed with him)

Wow. That’s amazing.

So, lets talk about your award-winning work

“When a tree falls in the forest”

Where did you get the idea for this work?

EMERSON

Well that’s a very interesting story.

(It really isn’t)

I was having a discussion with some of my friends over dim sum at LuLu Ma’s1 in Paris when the old saying came up ” When a tree falls in the forest and there is no one to hear it, does it make a sound.”

(as if he is imparting a great truth of the universe)

And I thought. “When a tree falls in the forest it means something to the tree.”

So I thought of making an artwork that can respond to art.

1. He is obviously name dropping. LuLuMa is an award-winning fusion restaurant that combines the best in French cooking mixed with Asian food. Its specialties include Bavarian Cashew Chicken and Pate Sushi.
I didn’t want to bore you with the entire piece, but if you want to read the rest of the (unannotated) interview, it is in the tag across the top that says Lunatics – Reading scripts – R. Allen Emerson of you can go here.

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About rozzychan

Rosalyn Hunter is the principal writer on the series Lunatics. Please support us. http://lunatics.tv

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